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Relentless in nature and versatile in form MALOX are a virtuoso musical force to be reckoned with. Featuring Eyal Talmudi on saxophone, clarinet and bagpipes and Roy Chen on drums, the Israeli duo delivers a high-energy, free-form, one-two punch. Their music is raw and left-field yet equally catchy and undeniably danceable. Drawing from diverse genres such as jazz, polka, klezmer, punk or alternative rock their playfully complex compositions are a real trip.

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Eyal Talmudi: Sax, Clarinet, Bag Pipes
Roy Chen: Drums
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Live Videos

Malox – "The Nice Skinhead" (Live @ Negev Festival 2014)
Malox – "Svornato Horo" (Live @ Balcony TV)
Malox – Live @ jazzahead (Bremen) 2013

Official Videos

Malox – "Gaza Trip"
Malox – "Boombastic"
Malox – "Natanya"
Malox – "Dance Like An Egyptian"
press
Klezmer and Caribbean rhythms meet film scores.
(Celtic-Folk-Punk Blog 27/03/13) +

“They play their own music in which klezmer and Caribbean rhythms meet film scores. There are no vocals, but they don’t need them. Their music is intended for dancing and they create atmospheres.” – Celtic-Folk-Punk Blog 

From Balkan motives to cat's wailing.
(Habama 21/10/12) +

“MALOX – Eyal Talmudi’s crazy and impossible duet generates totally energetic music that fills the stage from Klezmer to Jazz. Warm and round sounds blend in distorted sounds. From Balkan motives to cat’s wailing. A crazy yet fascinating act” – Amos Oren, Habama

Referencing the Klezmer legacy.
(All About Jazz 11/01/08) +

“The bulk of Talmudi’s original compositions reference the Klezmer legacy. His energetic arrangements spice them up with updated sonic elements, including a bit of thick, and dub-influenced sax choir” – Eyal Hareuveni, All About Jazz

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Dancing To Nothing

MALOX Add Assaf Talmudi To The Mix And Unveil Raucous Live Studio Take
Greedy

BREAKING: Our favourite two-man wrecking crew... Wait a minute. Re-wiiind! Make that a three-man wrecking crew. Yes, you heard right. MALOX, our favourite three-man wrecking crew, has evolved and will be performing [...]

BREAKING: Our favourite two-man wrecking crew... Wait a minute. Re-wiiind! Make that a three-man wrecking crew. Yes, you heard right. MALOX, our favourite three-man wrecking crew, has evolved and will be performing as a trio from now on. Joining the musical one-two punch of Eyal Talmudi (sax, clarinet, bag-pipes) and Roy Chen (drums) is Eyal's brother Assaf Talmudi, who will add his keyboard genius and electronic flair to the already potent mix we witnessed on the combo's latest LP "Gaza Trip".

This literally opens up an entire new realm of possibility, which has us twitching nervously in anticipation of what's to come. That being said and if only to put our restless souls at ease, the new and improved three-piece just released a brand new studio video, recorded and performed live at Slik Studios in Tel Aviv and even including what looks to be a vocalist. You decide.

The video is called "Dancing To Nothing" and is a rawer, more straight-forward take on a previous collaboration between Eyal Talmudi, Roy Chen and Buttering Trio's Rejoicer, released via Time Grove Selections on a record called "Saved My Eyes From Tears" (featuring Omri Mor). New MALOX member Assaf Talmudi, by the way, is a leading producer, composer and instrumentalist on the Israeli pop and experimental circuit and has produced albums for the likes of Berry Sakarof, Ehud Banai, Shlomy Shaban and Shai Tsabary. But for now, let's enjoy "Dancing To Nothing". This track really has a vamped up Ethiopian jazz / Mulatu Astatke vibe to it. Don't you think? 

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Gaza Trip

MALOX Premier New Parkour Video On The Occasion Of Palestinian Independence Day
Greedy

November 15th marked Palestinian Independence Day, as proclaimed by Yasser Arafat in 1988. And although this day may have slipped under your radar, MALOX decided to issue a musical statement by premiering the [...]

November 15th marked Palestinian Independence Day, as proclaimed by Yasser Arafat in 1988. And although this day may have slipped under your radar, MALOX decided to issue a musical statement by premiering the official music video to the title track of their third studio album "Gaza Trip" on this day. 

The video features a rare collaboration between two Israeli musicians, aka MALOX, and Palestinian parkour athletes 3run Gaza. Despite ongoing political conflict, the two groups managed to come together and creatively channel their aspirations for a peaceful co-existence. 

“We recorded the song when I was living closer to Gaza and could hear everything that was happening nearby. We began collaborating with Israeli singer ECHO and guitarist Uri Brauner Kinrot and we had the idea to bring the everyday sights of Gaza to our video along with director Yoav Ruda. Israel’s treatment of Palestine troubles us greatly, and it is part of our role as artists to talk about the occupation and restrictions on movement", comment MALOX.

See the acrobatic video below with a soundtrack by MALOX, featuring Echo (of Echo & Tito), Uri Brauner Kinrot (of Boom Pam) and, last but not least, the members of 3run GAZA:

"I’ve climbed the tallest mountain and still I couldn't see / I wanted to be happy when the party comes to me / Sounds from a mono stereo, put on your records and dance / I wanted to be happy, take me to your special place... / We arrived to a garden with a cinema, minimal screen / They all looked like criminals, mommy I'm scared / I'm dancing without control, and I know I'm gonna slip and maybe fall / Double my trouble and take me again / Gardens are walls inside my head / Break my own rules, give me a shot / Try to be free, take what I got / I gotta be patient, the fire it starts / Down from the feet, straight to the heart / I used to have power, I used to feel grip / Until somebody gave me my first Gaza trip." 

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Chinese Live Sessions

Malox And Red Scarf Face Off At Shenzhen's Old Heaven Bookstore
Greedy

Wow, what a trip! Fresh off the heels of their recent China Tour, with a string of shows in Beijing, Guizhou, Guangzhou and finally Shenzhen (as part of the OCT-LOFT Jazz Festival), MALOX just dropped a new [...]

Wow, what a trip! Fresh off the heels of their recent China Tour, with a string of shows in Beijing, Guizhou, Guangzhou and finally Shenzhen (as part of the OCT-LOFT Jazz Festival), MALOX just dropped a new 20-minute reminder of all the additional fun they had along the way. Watch the video below to see them explore a raucously wild sax 'n' drums face-off with the local Red Scarf crew, during a live improv session at Shenzhen's Old Heaven Book Store, accompanied by flute and electric guitar. Parental discretion advised. This gets intense.

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Boombastic

Tel Aviv's Malox unveil explosive new clip featuring Echo & Tito
Greedy

There's nothing like a Ms. Bombastic to pull you back out of that holiday hole you dug for yourselves. If you were wondering how we came up with this metaphor, Tel Aviv's terrible two, alias Malox, just teamed up [...]

There's nothing like a Ms. Bombastic to pull you back out of that holiday hole you dug for yourselves. If you were wondering how we came up with this metaphor, Tel Aviv's terrible two, alias Malox, just teamed up with the equally impressive Echo & Tito, to release their joint cover and souk-tinged counterpart to Shaggy's notorious smasher "Mr. Boombastic". The track is off their latest album "Gaza Trip" released earlier this year and a real blast. 

Before you move on to the video below, we should warn you that in this case, Ms. Bombastic is a curvy, gold chain wearing British Bulldog, taking Tel Aviv in stride. But see for yourselves. 

On another note, Malox will be travelling to the People's Republic of China this November. As always you can find the dates in our live section

Have a nice weekend everybody!

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Ayalew Mesfin

Rediscover A Rare And Beautiful Moment In Ethiopian Music History
 

Now-Again Records and Vinyl Me, Please have teamed up to release "one of the last treasure troves of Ethiopian Funk" by Ethiopian legend Ayalew Mesfin, over 40 years after its initial appearance. Recorded in the [...]

Now-Again Records and Vinyl Me, Please have teamed up to release "one of the last treasure troves of Ethiopian Funk" by Ethiopian legend Ayalew Mesfin, over 40 years after its initial appearance. Recorded in the 1970's with his Black Lion Band, Mesfin's music "is among the funkiest to arise from Addis Ababa".

With a near two dozen 7" singles and several reel-to-reel tapes to his name, "Hasabe (My Worries)" is the first anthology of his music. Only four of his songs were previously reissued within Francis Falcetto's "Ethiopiques" series. “Most of my works revolve around social issues, as well as political commentary. Even though my songs appear to be about lovers, or other mundane topics, they are open to interpretation,” Mesfin explains. 

As the Derg regime took control of the country in 1974, Ayalew Mesfin was forced underground and was eventually imprisoned for three months: "My discontent with the military government grew over time, until I got to the point in deciding to expose the brutal dictatorship through my music,” Mesfin states. For more context, read an excerpt from the liner notes.

Listen to the very James Brown-esque "Liba Menta Hone" in the SoundCloud player above and watch the short film below on Ayalew's story and his music. A variation of the record will be released on Now-Again in late 2018.

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Simple Love

Ghanaian Wordsmith M.anifest Shares Gorgeous New Music Video

Crowned "Best Rapper" (in addition to winning "HipHop Song of the Year" for "God MC") at the 2017 Ghana Music Awards, M.anifest picked the day after Valentine's Day to drop the gorgeous companion video to "Simple [...]

Crowned "Best Rapper" (in addition to winning "HipHop Song of the Year" for "God MC") at the 2017 Ghana Music Awards, M.anifest picked the day after Valentine's Day to drop the gorgeous companion video to "Simple Love", off his 2016-released album "Nowhere Cool".

Directed by Makere Thekiso with Motheo Moeng in charge of photography, the short film follows a ballet dancer's supple movements in slow-motion, as she winds her way through a bustling street market scenery by a harbour and M.anifest sings: "I want that simple love, money cannot buy."

It looks like the Ghanaian rapper, singer and songwriter has big things in store for 2018. But for now, "Simple Love" is all we need. 

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Death Is Not The End

UK Label & NTS Radio Broadcaster Readies Yet Another Dusty Excavation

Little seems known about the London-based imprint and monthly NTS Radio show host  Death Is Not The End, specializing in "dusty gospel, blues, folk and excavations from the field". If you are into obscure digs [...]

Little seems known about the London-based imprint and monthly NTS Radio show host  Death Is Not The End, specializing in "dusty gospel, blues, folk and excavations from the field". If you are into obscure digs however, you may find extreme pleasure from rummaging through the label's Bandcamp page and the numerous releases up for grabs, ranging from mid-20th century Louisiana State Penitentiary spirituals to Mexican mushroom ceremonies and Circassian folklore

Earlier this month DINTE kicked off a new series on Greek Rebetika artists, recorded in the US during the '20s and '30s. First in line is George Katsaros with his "Greek Blues in America, Vol.1", which you can listen to and download here on a name your price basis. 

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The Wizard

WATCH: Brazilian Icon Hermeto Pascoal Perform a Free-Spirited Live-Set in São Paulo

In his native Brazil the multi-instrumentalist, composer and arranger Hermeto Pascoal is no short of a cultural icon and known as 'o bruxo', aka the wizard. UK-based record label Far Out Recordings recently released [...]

In his native Brazil the multi-instrumentalist, composer and arranger Hermeto Pascoal is no short of a cultural icon and known as 'o bruxo', aka the wizard. UK-based record label Far Out Recordings recently released a lost studio session from 1976, which was one of our favourites of 2017 and is now a staple of our private record collection.

That being said, early last year, Boiler Room uploaded a 50-minute live set of Hermeto Pascoal and his group performing live at Dekmantel São Paulo in front of a sunbathed crowd of partly enthusiastic onlookers. His band features Jota P on winds, Andre Marques on piano, Itiberê Zwarg on bass, Ajurinã Zwarg on drums and Hermeto's son Fabio Pascoal on percussion.

As for the music, well, if you like Brazilian jazz, free improvisation, intricate arrangements and masterful musicianship, then this should be your cup of tea. Watch the full show below. 

 

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Les Tout-Puissants

WATCH: Benin's Tout-Puissant Orchestre Poly-Rythmo Perform Live in Berlin (Full Show)

Back in June of last year we first introduced Benin's 'Almighty Polyrhythmic Orchestra of Cotonou' to our readers, on the occasion of their 2016-released "Madjafalao" LP (Because Music). That same month the largest [...]

Back in June of last year we first introduced Benin's 'Almighty Polyrhythmic Orchestra of Cotonou' to our readers, on the occasion of their 2016-released "Madjafalao" LP (Because Music). That same month the largest and officially the longest active African formation performed live in Berlin for the first time ever, adding to their steadily rising acclaim and rocking the crowds at YAAM Berlin with lively and equally virtuosic aplomb.

Today, we are excited to present you the live recording of that night, which you can enjoy below. What more is there to say about this impressive artistic presence and musical showmanship other than, 'wow'!

Then again, there must be a reason this formation has been around for 50-something years and counting.

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King Coya

Taking South American Folklore To New Heights

This one takes us back in time or forward, you decide. Hailing from the Northern Argentine Andes, renowned composer Gaby Kerpel is somewhat of a musical visionary. His digitalised, imaginary alter ego King Coya has [...]

This one takes us back in time or forward, you decide. Hailing from the Northern Argentine Andes, renowned composer Gaby Kerpel is somewhat of a musical visionary. His digitalised, imaginary alter ego King Coya has made a name for himself, by blending traditional elements from Colombian and Peruvian cumbias as well as Argentine folklore with electronic music.

His 2009 release on ZZK Records entitled "Cumbias de Villa Donde" features "an accessible yet timeless collection of original down-tempo, electro folklorica that bridges indigenous music out of South America with global dance". His tracks are the result of live performances at Buenos Aires' Zizek Club, "rich, layered compositions blending the new world with the old, the East and the West, an exercise in digital cross-global pollination" that is not readily pigeonholed.

So without further ado, treat yourselves to this full-length throwback, alias King Coya's "Cumbias de Villa Donde" and if time permits, make sure to check out the special King Coya ZZK mixtape below. Have a nice weekend!

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Guy One

Award-Winning Ghanaian Artist Releases International Debut On Berlin's Philophon Records

Berlin meet Bolgatanga on this recent release via Max Weissenfeldt's Philophon imprint, featuring Guy One. Simply entitled "#1" this is indeed a first for Guy One, "who grew up in remote northern Ghana with no [...]

Berlin meet Bolgatanga on this recent release via Max Weissenfeldt's Philophon imprint, featuring Guy One. Simply entitled "#1" this is indeed a first for Guy One, "who grew up in remote northern Ghana with no schooling, spending a life herding goats, building his own instruments and teaching himself to sing". At home and in the surrounding local villages the award-winning Guy One and his Frafra music are well-adored by a "fervent following", his voice a regular at weddings and funerals as well as on TV. 

Max Weissenfeldt began travelling to Ghana back in 2010, where he chanced upon a CD by Guy One and set out to find him: "Hours later the pair are driving to a funeral; the air is still warm, the metre-thick baobab trees cast shadows on the dusty fields under the shine of the moonlight. The village members are gathered between the mud huts as Guy One quietly picks up his Kologo (a sort of two-string banjo instrument that is fundamental to Frafra music). As he begins with his eulogizing voice, the village members immediately all form a huge circle around him. Witnessing this intense and potent interaction between music and community and life and death, Weissenfeldt knew he needed to get Guy One to Berlin and into a studio."

And so it ensued that in 2013 Guy One left Ghana for the very first time in his life, headed to Berlin to join Weissenfeldt and various band members and began recording an album dictated by groove, rhythm and musical intuition. In 2015 the band was invited to play the renowned Danish Roskilde Festival and a few days ago "#1" was released out into the open: "#1 is an album rooted in tradition as much as it is the contemporary but given the fact that the traditionalism of Frafra music itself is a largely unknown force, the results are more even more potent and stirring in their creations. Choirs, trumpet, organ, bass, drums, synthesiser, vibraphone, saxophone and piano, the album is as bursting with instrumentation as it is with ideas and innovation." Head over to Bandcamp and listen to Guy One's extraordinary musical journey, aka "#1". There is also a mini-series documenting life in Bolgatanga, to be found on the Philophon YouTube channel. Watch Part 1 below.

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Entremundos

Brazilian 10-Piece Nomade Orquestra Reveals An Audio-Visual World Of Sound On Sophomore Album

Hailing from the busy streets of São Paulo and "blending West African themes with Ethiopian jazz and North American styles" are Brazilian ethno-fusion collective Nomade Orquestra. In a review for The Guardian, [...]

Hailing from the busy streets of São Paulo and "blending West African themes with Ethiopian jazz and North American styles" are Brazilian ethno-fusion collective Nomade Orquestra. In a review for The Guardian, Robin Denselow writes: "This inventive, 10-piece instrumental band match a powerful brass section against guitars, drum and bass, creating tuneful big-band music driven by insistent riffs and constantly changing direction."

What he was referring to, was "EntreMundos" (Between Worlds), aka the band's second longplayer, which was recorded at Red Bull Studios in São Paulo and released on Far Out Recordings in May 2017. "EntreMundos is like a cosmic musical playground where Ethio-jazz, Indian classical and Oriental sounds dance around Afro-Brazilian roots rhythms and Northern hemisphere jazz, funk, soul, library music and hip-hop influences." 

It will hardly come as a surprise then that this album has gained Nomade Orquestra international recognition and turned heads across the globe. It doesn't seem like there's a musical influence not included in their rich and groovy tapestry. What's more, the band released a mind-boggling audio-visual companion to their second album, which definitely adds to the experience. Watch below and prepare to enter a world of sound. Also, for further reference, we would recommend this mini documentary.

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Super Liminal


London Afro-Latin Collective Penya Drops Percussion-Led New LP
 

Released late last week via Pete Buckenham's London-based, forward-thinking Jazz imprint On The Corner Records (which was just awarded 'Label of the Year' at Gilles Peterson's Worldwide Awards) and whom you may [...]

Released late last week via Pete Buckenham's London-based, forward-thinking Jazz imprint On The Corner Records (which was just awarded 'Label of the Year' at Gilles Peterson's Worldwide Awards) and whom you may already be familiar with through the Mugwisa International Xylophone Group release in 2017, is the amazingly energetic new "Super Liminal" LP by Afro-Colombian electronic four-piece Penya, aka the band led by multi-instrumentalist/composer/producer and percussive investigator Magnus P.I., alias Magnus Mehta (electric guitar / percussion).

Through extended field trips to Cuba, Morocco, Turkey, India or the streets of South London, "Magnus has built up an extensive knowledge of musical cultures and traditions and has earned a reputation for his creative and innovative approach to percussion", which he now incorporates into the carnivalesque, hypnotic, sound of Penya, be it "Cuban rumba or Haitian house" (Dr Rob, Test Pressing).

"Super Liminal", part of the group's most recent playful investigations into rhythmic patterns and percussive variations is uplifting to say the least and breathes new life into somewhat meditative musical traditions. Hit play on the SoundCloud player above for the full album stream.

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Innov Gnawa

A Performance Of Songs From The Jewish Songbook Of Moroccan Gnawa

If you haven't yet heard of Gnawa music, it is part of a North African tradition of spiritual religious songs and rhythms that remains one of the major musical currents in Morocco to this day. Often dubbed [...]

If you haven't yet heard of Gnawa music, it is part of a North African tradition of spiritual religious songs and rhythms that remains one of the major musical currents in Morocco to this day. Often dubbed 'Moroccan Blues', "Gnawa music is the ritual trance music of Morocco’s black communities, originally descended from slaves and soldiers once brought to Morocco from Northern Mali and Mauritania [that has] a raw, hypnotic power"

Based in New York City and formed in 2014 by Moroccan expat Samir LanGus, the Grammy-nominated musical collective Innov Gnawa has been keeping this ancient musical tradition alive, while adding its own contemporary spin. Late last year the outfit performed a two-part set (Set 1 / Set 2) live at the B'nai Israel Synagogue in Baltimore, Maryland, which you can watch a 20-minute excerpt from below; a rare performance of Jewish songs from the Gnawa repertoire: 

"Jews first settled in what is now Morocco as early as 70 CE, and at its peak in the 1940s, Morocco’s Jewish population exceeded 250,000. Early communities settled among and were made up of converted Berbers. A second wave of Sephardic Jews settled in the region after being expelled from the Kingdoms of Spain in 1492.”

For more Gnawa music, feel free to check out Innov Gnawa's self-entitled debut release over here

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Israel's Groove Scene

12 Essential Acts From The Tel Aviv / Jerusalem Scene

Another week has come to an end and thus, with some off-time in sight, we would like to tip our hat to Dave Jenkins and the friendly folks over at Bandcamp for their recent feature on the Israeli groove scene. With [...]

Another week has come to an end and thus, with some off-time in sight, we would like to tip our hat to Dave Jenkins and the friendly folks over at Bandcamp for their recent feature on the Israeli groove scene. With the help of Tel Aviv DJ and producer Sabbo, the article spans 12 essential acts on the local scene, along with links to their respective pages. 

“Maybe it’s a cliché, but Israel is all about fusion in its food, its architecture, and art,” explains Sabbo. “It’s in our genes already to mix things. It’s never been a thing to be a purist. We don’t intend to mix things, it happens naturally.”

The recommended artists and band include familiar faces the likes of Kutiman, Boom Pam and Ouzo Bazooka as well as Jerusalem-based sound man Markey Funk or 'mutated funk' outfit The Apples and afrofunk fusion combo Hoodna Orchestra. Head over to Bandcamp for the full feature and enjoy the extended dig.

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Before the Revolution

Listen To A Mix Of Pre-Revolution Music From Iran

In line with the recent protests in Iran, French daily La Libération published an article earlier this month detailing the continued censorship of music recorded before the revolution of 1979, during the reign of [...]

In line with the recent protests in Iran, French daily La Libération published an article earlier this month detailing the continued censorship of music recorded before the revolution of 1979, during the reign of the Shah. Such is the music by the likes of Gougoush, Ramesh, Zia, Shahram, Shabpareh or Mohammad Nouri that to this day, along with the usual pop music suspects from the Western hemisphere, remains forbidden. 

Ever since the revolution, all cultural production in Iran is under the strict auspices of the Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance to preserve so-called 'public chastity'. It's the ministry that decides if an artist may record his or her music, perform on stage or otherwise diffuse their work. In a 1979 interview with Ayatollah Khomeini, the country's former supreme leader claimed that music from the West "with its implications of pleasure and ecstasy, dulls the spirit" and that pop music "is similar to a drug".

However, during the past years DJs and reissue labels such as Finders Keepers, Pharaway Sounds or Light in the Attic have begun to unearth a host of pre-revolution productions. Take Finders Keepers co-founder Doug Shipton's wonderful "Pomegranates" compilation of 60s/70s Persian pop, funk, folk and psych nuggets for instance. The task is a risky one that demands patience and endurance, seeing as said productions remain illegal in Iran and thus hidden from view, but nonetheless popular. 

To accompany their article, foreign correspondents Marion Armengod and Franck Haderer added a 52-minute Pre-Revolution mix of tracks discovered during their stay, courtesy of French DJ Super Freak. Unfortunately, a tracklist was not included. Listen to the full mix here and read the full article "Téhéran: à la chasse aux chants cachés du Shah" here.

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